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What Type of Battery Do I Buy for My Hearing Aid?

It’s tricky to offer a definitive response to the question “What size of hearing aid battery do I buy?” because hearing aid models and designs vary widely, and so do the batteries that they use to power them. The easiest scenario to deal with is if you already own a hearing aid; if that’s the case, look at the owner’s manual that came with it or call the hearing care provider who sold it to you to determine the correct type of battery. If you do not wear a hearing aid yet and are trying to decide which type and model is best for you, do a little research. Different types of hearing aid batteries vary widely in price, and in battery life, so your selection of hearing aid can impact how much money you spend in the long run to use it.

The manufacturers of hearing aids and hearing aid batteries have made life simpler for you by coming up with a standardized color coding system, to make locating the right size easier. The types are all standard across manufacturers, so the color on the package is a dependable indicator of the battery type and size.

The four most common varieties are:

Size 675 / Blue – Blue indicates Size 675 batteries. These batteries are rather large and will hold a longer charge – as much as 300 hours. Size 675 batteries are typical in larger Behind-the-Ear (BTE) hearing aids and in cochlear implants.

Size 13 / Orange – The color orange always means Size 13 batteries. Size 13 batteries are intermediate in size and hold a charge for around 240 hours. This size battery is common in In-the-Ear (ITE) and Behind-the-Ear (BTE) hearing aids.

Size 312 / Brown – A color code of brown corresponds to a Size 312 battery, generally found in In-The-Ear (ITE) and In-The-Canal (ITC) types of hearing aids; because of their smaller size they typically have battery life of 175 hours.

Size 10 / Yellow – Size 10 hearing aid batteries are identified with a color code of yellow, and are presently the most widely used, being used in many Completely-In-Canal (CIC) and In-The-Canal (ITC) styles; because of their smaller size, they have an estimated battery life of roughly 80 hours.

Some varieties of hearing aids demand alternative batteries, however these are the most common. Purchasing alternate sizes can be a tad more difficult since many retailers do not stock or advertise them, however if you ask they can be ordered for you.

Prior to stocking up on batteries, remember to read the owner’s manual that was included with your unit to be sure it does not use rechargeable batteries; if it does, you need disposable batteries only as back-up. To keep your batteries fresh and fully charged after you buy them, always store them inside at room temperature and in their unopened, original packages.

This entry was posted on Monday, September 9th, 2013 at 12:31 am. Both comments and pings are currently closed.